The Society of Black Archaeologists

Resources

Online Maps and Databases


The Geography of Slavery in Virginia

http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/

The Geography of Slavery project contains more than 4000 advertisements for runaway slaves and indentured servants, drawn from newspapers in Virginia and Maryland, covering the years from 1736 through 1803.


Digital Harlem

http://acl.arts.usyd.edu.au/harlem/

The Digital Harlem website presents information, drawn from legal records, newspapers and other archival and published sources, about everyday life in New York City's Harlem neighborhood in the years 1915-1930.


Hidden Patterns of the Civil War

http://dsl.richmond.edu/civilwar/

"Hidden Patterns of the Civil War" collects a number of interrelated projects on the sectional crisis, slavery, and emancipation during the Civil War era, with a particular emphasis on the histories of the city of Richmond and the state of Virginia. Grouped as "texts" and "maps," these projects use digital tools and digital media to uncover and represent patterns that are not easy to find when we look at particular pieces of evidence in isolation and only become evident when we visualize a wealth of evidence in graphs, maps, and models.


 

Mapping the DuBois' 
The Philadelphia Negro

http://venus.cml.upenn.edu/UPennSD_PhilaNegro/

Equipped with Dubois' "The Philadelphia Negro," researchers use GIS to recreate socio-economic trends for blacks in Philadelphia's historic 7th Ward. Users can create their own maps online to analyze spatial patterns. The website also contains teaching materials.


Greater Philadelphia GeoHistory Network

http://www.philageohistory.org/geohistory/index.cfm

This site contains thousands of old maps, property atlases, city directories, industrial site surveys, and other items documenting the history and development of Philadelphia from the 1600s through today.


Transatlantic Slave Trade Database

http://slavevoyages.org/

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on almost 35,000 slaving voyages that forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans for transport to the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. It offers researchers, students, and the general public a chance to rediscover the reality of one of the largest forced movements of people in world history.