The Society of Black Archaeologists

The Society of Black Archaeologists

Promoting Academic Excellence and Social Responsibility

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Advocating for academic excellence and social responsibility since 2011

Headquartered in Washington D.C. with members throughout the world, the Society of Black Archaeologists works to increase the number of professionally trained archaeologists of African descent through the promotion of social responsibility, academic excellence and the creation of spaces that foster the SBA’s goals and activities.

The SBA promotes the proper treatment of African and African diaspora material culture, promotes community engagement and collaborations within the field, raises and addresses concerns related to African peoples worldwide, and highlights past and present achievements and contributions people of African descent have made to the field of archaeology. 

 

Contact

Email Us!

sbarchaeologists@gmail.com

 
 

SBA at a glance


oral History Project

Listen to Dr. Peggy Brunache, lecturer at Dundee University, speak with Ayana Flewellen about some of the challenges associated with African Diaspora archaeology, her move to Scotland and the opportunities and challenges associated with juggling multiple professions. 

Dr. Peggy Brunache

Dr. Peggy Brunache



In the News

We are proud to announce that the Society of Black Archaeologists hosted it's largest meeting to date with 25 attendees (not all are pictured) at the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 4, 2018! We have exciting plans moving forward as a 501c3 Non-profit. We are currently developing exciting projects to help assist and train a new generation of archaeologists.
 

Image of members from our 2018 annual meeting.

Image of members from our 2018 annual meeting.

 
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Estate Little Princess

Since the summer of 2016, the SBA has been developing a multi-year sustainable archaeology project at the Estate Little Princess in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, in collaboration with the Slave Wrecks Project. Project organizers recently published in the Association of Black Anthropologists journal Transforming Anthropology.

Howard University student Jewell Humphrey and Dr. Alicia Odewale excavating at the Estate Little Princess.

Howard University student Jewell Humphrey and Dr. Alicia Odewale excavating at the Estate Little Princess.


 
To accept one’s past – one’s history – is not the same thing as drowning in it; it is learning how to use it. An invented past can never be used; it cracks and crumbles under the pressures of life like clay in a season of drought
— James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time
 
 

 
 

Join Our Listserv

Use the form below to contact us. Please be as detailed as possible.

We are always looking for new members. If you would like more information regarding membership please include your name and affiliation.

We are also available for talks and interviews.

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